Hedgerows are rustling with new life

LAST April our wonderful bluebell woods provided one enduring positive image of life during 40 days of lockdown.

LIFE DURING LOCKDOWN: bluebells in a Chilterns wood PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

As the pandemic swept the country and travel restrictions limited our movements to the byways around our homes, it was an emotional and confusing month for many.

OPEN ASPECT: walking near Coleshill PICTURE: Lesley Tilson

Thankfully one year on, those glorious vistas of dancing bluebells are not the only symbol of hope to cling onto.

GO WITH THE FLOW: the River Chess near Scotsbridge PICTURE: Debbie Chapman

They still may be the ultimate symbol of the Chilterns countryside, but other colours are also fighting for our attention: the swathes of cherry and apple blossom, the cowslips dotting local fields or wild garlic springing up by a country roadside.

SCENT OF SPRING: wild garlic PICTURE: Lesley Tilson

Oil seed rape is beginning to flower, the creamy coloured leaves of the blackthorn have been joined by hawthorn blossom, and there’s a positive frenzy of activity among those colourful hedgerows.

TINY TITBITS: a mouse forages for food PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

Between nest-building and feeding new families, our garden birds are frantically busy with their household chores.

HOME COMFORTS: a jay searches for nesting materials PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

There are all those young mouths to feed, tasty morsels to discover and take back home to deliver.

MOUTHS TO FEED: a robin picks up a tasty snack PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

It’s not just the birds who are on the lookout for food either: our resident mammals can also sometimes be spotted out and about on breakfast duty.

ON THE PROWL: a fox heads home with food for the family PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

Living close to water we’re lucky enough to be treated to an array of delightful wildfowl too, all very individual characters.

DRESSED TO IMPRESS: a mandarin duck PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

But the circle of life can be cruel at this time of year. One day a proud mother duck appears at the door with 15 delightful fluffy chicks waddling in her wake.

FLUFFY BROOD: greylag goslings PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

But then we have to watch and wait as the family gradually gets whittled down in size by hungry herons and other local predators.

FISHING EXPEDITION: a pair of egrets PICTURE: Nick Bell

Soon there and nine…and then six…and then five. A week or two later and there are still a trio healthy looking ducklings snapping at insects on the pond, though their small size still makes them look a little too much like tasty snacks for mum to relax entirely.

CHEEKY CHARACTER: an inquisitive starling PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

Close by, a cheeky starling has set up home in a neighbour’s eaves and has become a colourful and precocious addition to the characters round the feeders.

SMART PLUMAGE: a starling proves a confident new arrival PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

Prone to strut about in his smart distinctive plumage like a Cockney costermonger donning their Pearly King outfit for the first time, he is disproportionately cocky for his size, elbowing the bulkier ducks and pigeons aside as if it is they who are intruding on his patch.

THRIVING: the speckled wood butterfly PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

April sees the emergence of a whole array of insects, reptiles and butterflies, like the striking orange tip butterflies which have spent the winter months as a chrysalis hidden among last year’s vegetation, or the speckled wood, which seem to have been thriving in both numbers and distribution over the past 40 years as a result of climate change.

DISTINCTIVE WINGS: the orange-tip butterfly PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

Now they’re on the wing, feeding on spring flower nectar and looking for a mate, another welcome splash of colour in a landscape that has fully awoken from the drab, dreary days of winter.

FLORAL DISPLAY: the landscape wakes up after winter PICTURE: Sue Craigs Erwin

If the colours provide splashes of detail worthy of close inspection on those backroad rambles and woodland wanders, they also provide a striking backdrop of hues for distant vistas too, the green shoots and bursting buds a welcome reminder that spring has once again returned with a vengeance.

SPRING IN THE AIR: the view near Coleshill PICTURE: Lesley Tilson

There may still be a chill in the morning air, but the morning dog walk is no longer a battle against the elements, and now there’s something new and exciting to discover at every turn in the path.

INTO THE WOODS: an early morning walk PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

For the earliest risers there are sneaky glimpses of the natural world preparing to meet the day…deer browsing in the woods or a fox returning proudly back to its den with its prey.

STRANGER DANGER: a muntjac senses an intruder PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

In April 2020 Melissa Harrison wrote movingly of the bittersweet emotions associated with witnessing spring at the height of lockdown, a theme echoed in her podcast of the same name.

COLOUR CONTRASTS: a peacock butterfly PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

“For some, spring is making confinement feel worse,” she wrote. “But I find it immensely comforting to sense the seasons’ ancient rhythms, altered but as yet uininterrupted, pulsing slow beneath our human lives.

SWEET MELODY: linnets need seeds throughout the year PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

“Onwards spring romps, as miraculous and dizzying as ever, whether humans are there to witness it or not.”

SNAPPY DRESSER: the colourful goldfinch PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

Luckily, this year it is indeed possible to witness it again at close hand, not just in our own immediate corner of the woods, but with the freedom to travel a little further afield, even if our awareness of the pandemic dangers is as real as ever.

LITTLE BEAUTY: the holly blue butterfly PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

Last year we could not stray far, and it helped to focus our minds on the beauty of the natural world that we so often take for granted.

LOCKDOWN LIMITS: the pandemic cast long shadows PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

Once more offered the freedom to travel a little further in search of the natural wonders around us, it’s a time to appreciate the true wonder of that annual “miraculous” reawakening.

SPRING AWAKENING: the green-veined white butterfly PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

“There is a silent eloquence/In every wild bluebell,” wrote a 20-year-old Anne Bronte all those years ago – and from Ashridge to Cliveden, Hodgemoor woods to Watlington Hill, those vivid symbols of nature’s beauty that were so very precious 12 months ago remain as eloquent as ever, carpeting woodland floors across the Chilterns.

ELOQUENT SYMBOL: Chilterns bluebells PICTURE: Graham Parkinson

As always, we’d like to give a very big thank you to all the keen local photographers who have allowed us to use their work this month. If you would like to contribute any pictures, favourite moments or seasonal suggestions to our calendar entry for May, contact editor@thebeyonder.co.uk on email or via our Facebook group page.

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