Art which speaks volumes

FOR millions of Catholics around the world, today’s Gospel reading at Mass is a very familiar story.

Luke is explaining how, with the crowds gathering around him, Jesus recounts the parable of the sower spreading his seed on different types of land, to see much of it trampled on, eaten by birds, withered or choked. Only the seed falling into rich soil grows to produce a successful crop.

Jesus goes on to explain what the parable means in relation to the word of God. But it’s doubtful if too many in the average congregation would immediately relate the story to images of a street artwork conceived by a graffiti artist in Lithuania.

STAR SEEDER: graffiti art by Morfai in Kaunas, Lithuania

That’s where art expert, entrepreneur and seminarian Patrick van der Vorst comes in.

Some 18 months ago the former Sotheby’s director launched a new website linking daily gospel readings with poignant and reflective works of art, accompanied by a short personal commentary.

His choice for today’s reading is Star Seeder, a piece of graffiti art which went viral after it appeared on a wall in Kaunas, the second-largest city in Lithuania.

As Patrick goes on to explain: “At first there was simply the bronze statue (on the left on our photo) created by Bernardas Bučas (1903–1979) in Kaunas, the art deco capital of Lithuania. The sculpture embodies the interwar period where the peasant is sowing grains, working for his country. Fast forward to 2008. Street artist Morfai sprayed the wall behind the sculpture with stars. The composition works only at night, as then with the light which is shining upon the monument, a shadow of the sculpture is cast onto the wall, which then corresponds with the stars being sown by the shadow silhouette of the sower… The grains have become stars…”

Patrick then explains the parable connection by pointing out how the street artwork makes no sense during the day – it is only when night comes that the sculpture shadow is cast onto the wall and the artwork does make sense.

Likewise with parables it may be that they make little sense at first sight, he says. “It is only at certain times, or when our own personal circumstances change, or a certain light is shining upon a certain aspect of our lives that the parables make sense,” he writes.

Ironically, the original artwork was overpainted and it was only eight years later that Morfai was invited to restore it, this time incorporated black granite stars onto the wall behind the statue.

Meanwhile Patrick, who moved to London from Belgium in 1995, worked for years at Sotheby’s before featuring as a winner on the TV programme Dragons’ Den when his antiques-valuing website Value My Stuff was backed by both Deborah Meaden and Theo Paphitis.

But the entrepreneur’s life took a new twist in 2019 when he enrolled as a seminarian with the Diocese of Westminster, studying at the Pontifical Beda College in Rome to become a priest.

His website features an extraordinary range of artworks spanning the centuries, and allowing visitors to consider the daily reading from a new perspective.

His website offers a daily news letter by email with the Gospel reading of the day, alongside an appropriate work of art and short reflection.